Whole Foods Wednesday – Why Are Egg Sammiches Not Good For You?!

I love food. Like, LOVE FOOD.

And breakfast sammiches rank hiiiiiigh on my list of favorites. And I could (and if my health wouldn’t suffer for it, would…) eat them every day!

But I don’t, because that’s not balance. When I start my morning with a good-for-me breakfast, most often, the rest of the day just flows much better!

I still enjoy a bagel (boy do I enjoy it!) or a breakfast sammich, because, BALANCE… but for me, my health, and my goals, that’s not the norm, and I’m grateful I enjoy, and my body responds well to, cleaner breakfasts!

Today: farina with a tsp of Maple syrup, cinnamon, apples and walnuts – so good!

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Whole Foods Wednesday – Winter Squash

There’s a reason your mama was always trying to get you to eat squash – it’s SO good for you! Winter squash has long been recognized as an important food source of carotenoids, but also has antioxidant support, anti inflammatory benefits, and potential blood sugar regulation benefits.

Winter squash is labeled low on the Glycemic index! Many of the carbs in winter starch come from polysaccharides found in the cell walls. Research has shown other nutrients found in winter squash are beneficial for blood sugar control. These nutrients include the B-vitamin like compound d-chiro-inositol, a nutrient we expect to hear more about with regards to blood sugar regulation.

It’s hearty, versatile, and there are tons of varieties – go get your squash on!

Do you have any favorite recipes featuring winter squash?

 

Whole Foods Wednesday – Rhubarb

Did you know rhubarb is up on the short list with Salmon and Spinach, of foods with the most calcium? I didn’t either – pays to learn about food!

Most people use rhubarb as if it were a fruit, but…. rhubarb is actually a vegetable! It can be used in both sweet and savory dishes.

Do you have any favorite rhubarb recipes?

(Note: you only want to be eating the stalks – the leaves are poisonous – just chop them off and discard!)

 

Whole Foods Wednesday – Beets

Beets, beets, delicious fruits… oh wait, wrong jingle! And beets aren’t a fruit – but they ARE colorful little powerhouses of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals!

As a very good source of the antioxidant manganese and a good source of the antioxidant vitamin C, the unique phytonutrients in beets provide antioxidant support in a different way than other antioxidant-rich vegetables. These little beauties are also an excellent source of folate and a very good source of manganese, potassium and copper. They are a good source of dietary fiber, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin C, iron and vitamin B6.

I love beets – I get this love from my mama!

Do you like beets?

 

Whole Foods Wednesday – Zucchini

Who likes zucchini? I love it, and its pretty versatile too! We have used it as a base for taco boats, sautéed them, grilled them, and even grown them! Love Zucchini!

Do you know why Zucchini is so widely revered?

Here is a sampling of why!

  • Zucchini is 95% water, low in calories, and high in fiber
  • It’s a good source of Vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant which plays a huge role in keeping your immune system healthy, and aids in fighting respiratory problems. The anti-inflammatory properties help keep your lungs open and clear.
  • The high fiber content also helps lower your cholesterol.
  • It’s good for your heart! Zucchini contains good amounts of potassium that helps reduce blood pressure, and the magnesium content helps keep blood pressure at a steady rhythm.

Oh, and good news for my fellow Diabetics! The abundance of Vitamin B in zucchini benefits us by breaking down the sugar in our bodies, and the fiber and pectin are vital in regulating our blood sugar levels!

In other words, eat more zucchini! 🙂

 

Whole Foods Wednesday – Garbanzo Beans

You may know these as garbanzo beans, and you may know them as chickpeas, but either way, you cannot have Hummus without them!

These little buddies boast fabulous fiber content, and are a clean source of protein! They have a delicious nut-like taste and a buttery, yet starchy, pasty texture.

Both the outer layer and main inner portion of garbanzo beans contain a wealth of phytonutrients. The outer seed coat can be concentrated in flavonoids, including quercetin, kaempferol and myricetin. The interior of the beans is typically rich in ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and vanillic acid. All of these phytonutrients function as antioxidants, and many also function as anti-inflammatory nutrients. Garbanzo beans are an excellent source of molybdenum and manganese, and a very good source of folate and copper as well as a good source of dietary fiber, phosphorus, protein, iron and zinc.

Tiny but mighty — are you a fan?

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