Thirsty Thursday – Drink Your Water

For people with Diabetes, the risk of dehydration is greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of Diabetes.

drink your water

Water is, according to Diabetes specialists, important for everybody, but especially for Diabetes patients, because even a small decrease of the hydration level could cause serious health problems for Diabetics. One of the best warning signs that glucose levels are high is thirst. And, water is the best way to quench that thirst, and to break down those sugars. Also, in order to keep the body functioning normally, water should be a constant. But, water can be lost through exercise and normal exposure to high temps. With that, being hydrated will help prevent fatigue and help physical performance.

Me personally, I do very well with getting plenty of water into my system every day. I have a favorite water jug that you will almost always find at my side. The “rule” I follow is to drink at least half of your body weight in ounces. For me that is 58 ounces a day, and I surpass that. I typically drink 4 or 5 containers worth of water, and my container is 24 ounces.

How much water do you drink on average?

Thirsty Thursday – Stay Hydrated

Ever suffered from dehydration? This happens more than a lot of people realize, and it can be really serious.

For people with Diabetes, the risk of dehydration is even greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of Diabetes.

Be sure to stay hydrated

Mild dehydration symptoms include headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, fatigue, and dark-colored urine. Severe dehydration causes all those symptoms plus low blood pressure, sunken eyes, weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat, confusion, and lethargy. But some people don’t get these symptoms, especially older people. It seems that thirst signals become weaker as we age. Diabetes may get people used to thirst so they don’t feel it as much.

If we aren’t drinking enough water, the kidneys still need water to eliminate excess glucose and other unwanted products. So they will basically raid the rest of the body for fluid to keep functioning. Gradually, our cells become dryer and dryer, which we might first notice in the eyes and mouth. Keeping yourself hydrated keeps everything functioning smoothly, minimizing your risk.